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Assessing Donald Trump's Win

Hello.

I was going to do a video blog but decided this was my more natural environmment. As a political and religious blog that I like to think is serious, I felt that I had to talk about the election of Donald Trump in all its facets and from my unique perspective. Feel free to comment!

I didn't vote in this election. After nearly two years of campaigning, I felt like I got to know both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump well enough to not like both of them equally for completely different reasons. Clinton flirted with World War - Russia baiting was rampant in the three debates, along with a good degree of hawkishness on the Middle East, with a particular obsession with getting rid of Bashar Assad, one of the only figures keeping Syria together.

The whole thing reeked of some level of scam too. I still think that, even though Donald Trump won. It still seems weird that people who knew one another for that long happened to run for president in the same year. It's anyone's guess what that scam was - many of Trump's proposed policies are actually very progressive and only clouded in conservative language. This went from his gun policy to health care, where the policies, when actually looked at, seemed more progressive than anything Obama ever proposed. It may be possible that they were covering all their bets.

I had just moved from Portland back to California and by the time I got here, the deadline for voting was approaching. I couldn't get myself motivated enough to do it in time, even if I found a polling place to vote for Bernie Sanders back during primary season. Apparently half the country's eligible voters felt the same way.

The social climate continued to deteriorate as Trump's brash campaign continued. I had a roommate who went insane in Portland, forcing me to leave. He talked about the world not getting any better and threatened to kill himself while talking both to me and to a friend of mine. I encountered someone just like him at the aforementioned friend's house. Friends seemed to snap and scream and shout at the smallest thing and I witnessed it with other people as well. Everyone sounded racist and weird. I have one person who blocked me as a consequence of Donald Trump's election as we speak (I won't go more in to that here).

One other friend of mine from Mexico recently said she'd like to visit me but that "the situation between my country and your country, I don't think so." I do lay the blame for that at Trump's feet, who took Mexico and its immigrants as a population to pigeonhole in order to gain power. There have been overt Ku Klux Klan rallies, a happy David Duke and riots as a result of this campaign. There have been even worse things in the world as a result of Hillary Clinton but these things can't be ignored.

Trump is a piece of shit, a con man and scumbag. Given that, such a man reminds people of reality. Whereas the charisma and perceived prestige of a man like Barack Obama belied many of the destructive policies that occurred during his reign, a scumbag like Trump might be so reviled that the absolute worst and least is expected. His agenda, absent the mass deportations, actually sounded good - his health care plan would benefit me much more than Obamacare did and his plan to rebuild infrastructure is something sorely needed in a country with creeking, collapsing bridges. Other scumbags like Richard Nixon and Theodore Roosevelt managed to bring us trade with China and the National Park System when they weren't breaking in to hotels and being a "Bully," respectively, both legacies I prefer to Obama's continuation of George W. Bush's interventionist foreign policy in to five new Muslim countries, spurring a wave of jihadism like nothing previously seen.

I could be wrong. Glenn Beck could be wrong.  Neville Chamberlain was infamously impressed with Adolf Hitler, while many of Germany's Jews belied any harm that would come to them at the hands of the Reich. A man like Donald Trump either could be the absolute worst in the history of the United States (and the current social climate certainly makes that seem like a possibility) or he could be one of America's many scumbags, who managed to actually help the people because they enjoyed the attention and gratification.

Likewise he could be neither and just be a goofier and more verbally offensive version of the last two presidents - jettisoning his friendship with Vladimir Putin (something that would not be without consequence) for a continuation of the Middle East interventions that are necessary to keep America's petroleum based lifestyle going. (Obama talked about closing Guantanamo and the country's many Middle East wars when he ran for office initially.) We really don't know. It will be interesting to say the least.

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About Radical Second Things

Michael Orion is a blogger, writer, artist and photographer based in the Bay Area. Besides his maintenance and promotion of Radical Second Things, he contributes to the San Francisco newspaper SF Western Edition, where he writes about local non-profit organizations.

Mark Cappetta is a practicing Catholic and active LGBT activist. He has been instrumental in keeping Radical Second Things and updates the Facebook account almost daily.

Eva Gnostiquette is an artist, programmer, "future scientist," bi-trans girl and graphic designer. She voluntarily helped to create the first print issue Radical Second Things and designed our beautiful banners. Thanks so much, Eva!

Jordan Denato is a professional artist based out of Iowa. He took the initiative to illustrate both Jennifer Reimer's story and Michael Orion's Oscar Romero work. He has his own art studio, Tar and Feather Studios, and is a critical part of Radical Second Things.

Radical Second Things is a liberation theology themed blog that has clear cut goals - we see the structural decline of the United States and much of the west and hope to present alternatives that will offer "a preferential option for the poor" as more become vulnerable.

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