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Sponsored Writing: Reasons You Should Go To Church, Even If You're Not Religious

(Note: I was paid to publish this at Radical Second Things. Sponsored writing helps make blogging a financial operation and thus something I can afford to do actively. If you have sponsored writing you would like me to publish, message me at mopowell07@gmail.com.)

It is fairly common for nonreligious people to completely dismiss the notion of attending church. After all, if they don’t believe in that particular faith or religion, why would they attend? However, there are a handful of benefits of going to church, both personal and altruistic, that a nonreligious person can have.

Community

The first reason, and possibly the most beneficial, is that church can provide a sense of community. Generally, churchgoers are good people that aim to be better people and to give back to their church and community. Surrounding yourself with these types of people is never a bad idea. If you surround yourself with good people, the chances of you being a good person and doing good things increase exponentially.

Attending a church, even if you are nonreligious, can provide a sense of community to someone who is new to the area. You immediately begin to meet other members of the community and can form lasting friendships with them.

Churches often have external events that extend beyond worship services. Without attending church, you may not become aware of these external events. These events can provide a sense of community that you may be missing. Whether it is a church potluck or a holiday congregation party, attending church will allow you to be part of that community.

Giving Back


Another reason to go to church, even if you are not religious, is that it offers you an opportunity to be altruistic. There are a handful of ways to be an altruistic person but you can find even more opportunities through your church. It could be simply taking part in a canned food or toy drive, or helping to clean up part of the community.

The best part of supporting a cause that your church is supporting is that you get to do it with people that you know. For example, if you volunteer by yourself at a local soup kitchen, that is wonderful. However, if you join your congregation as they all volunteer at that same soup kitchen, you’ll have the opportunity to bond with other members of your church community.

Applicable Lessons

Another reason to go to church despite not being religious, is the sermons. This might seem a little contradictory. Why would you want to hear passages from the Bible and sermons from a preacher if you don’t believe in religion?

The reason is because they usually have some form of an applicable lesson to life hidden behind every story. You can usually glean at least one useful tidbit, if not an entire life lesson, out of various sermons given by pastors. These lessons can serve as useful life lessons to you despite their religious overtones.

There really is no substitute for hearing a life lesson, than from an impassioned speaker sharing a story that fluidly translates into that lesson. Sooner or later, one of the sermons will strike a chord in you personally, offering you a better glimpse into a personal experience you had or are currently having.

Confidant

Finally, you should go to church even if you are not religious because it offers you the chance to have a confidant, a trusted leader that you can turn to. Most pastors, priests, and other church leaders provide one-on-one guidance for their congregation members. Whether it is meeting for confession or just meeting with your pastor, going to church offers you a trusted figurehead to speak confidentially with.

This can be extremely beneficial for your life. There are some issues and situations that you may have trouble talking through with your friends or family members. Sometimes you just need a third party who will listen without bias, judgement, and will remain confidential. They can also provide you with guidance and advice that isn’t self-serving or biased based on their relationship with you. This can come in the form through a simple meeting or even a more structured approach such as pastoral counseling.

So even if you are not a religious person, you can benefit from attending church. Whether it is finding a good community, giving back to the community, learning life lessons, or being able to reach out to a confidant, attending church can have great benefits for even those that are not religious. reat benefits for even those that are not religious.

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About Radical Second Things

Michael Orion is a blogger, writer, artist and photographer based in the Bay Area. Besides his maintenance and promotion of Radical Second Things, he contributes to the San Francisco newspaper SF Western Edition, where he writes about local non-profit organizations.

Mark Cappetta is a practicing Catholic and active LGBT activist. He has been instrumental in keeping Radical Second Things and updates the Facebook account almost daily.

Eva Gnostiquette is an artist, programmer, "future scientist," bi-trans girl and graphic designer. She voluntarily helped to create the first print issue Radical Second Things and designed our beautiful banners. Thanks so much, Eva!

Jordan Denato is a professional artist based out of Iowa. He took the initiative to illustrate both Jennifer Reimer's story and Michael Orion's Oscar Romero work. He has his own art studio, Tar and Feather Studios, and is a critical part of Radical Second Things.

Radical Second Things is a liberation theology themed blog that has clear cut goals - we see the structural decline of the United States and much of the west and hope to present alternatives that will offer "a preferential option for the poor" as more become vulnerable.

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