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Barack Obama Is A Bad President

I am a radical. This website has "radical" in its description. I abhor racism, discrimination and an unchecked and unregulated capitalist system like the United States has. These are all true despite my past in the libertarian world. This article is not meant to endorse the artistocratic policies of George W. Bush but rather those of a more humanistic radicalism like what we see from left wing leaders in Latin America like Jose Mujica of Uraguay.

I do not and will not ever call myself a "progressive," however. Progressive is an American term that the Democratic Party in the United States adopted in the years preceding and then following the election of Barack Obama and its a term that I think will lose its appeal as it becomes associated with this bizarrely horrible tenure of our 44th president. Despite, and in my own view, because of those radical principles, I greatly look forward to Barack Obama leaving office in 2016.

This country has become dramatically worse than it was under George W. Bush. Our presidents are not god and beyond faulty leadership, of which Obama is certainly a very faulty and uninspiring leader no matter how glossy he may have seemed in 2008, they cannot be blamed for random murders that may take place in some of our cities. (Another article for another day would say that Obama's sorry leadership has trickled down throughout society.) However, Obama is directly responsible for some of the worst crisis in our times, notably the hyper militarization of police.

I remember the Bush years. I remember going to the airport during the Bush years. The increased security was stressful but I never felt like the world had been transformed. The security may have been armed but they did not advertise it. The country felt like a normal place. There were plenty of problems during the Bush years and Hurricane Katrina crystallized that. Whereas Katrina showed clear incompetence from the administration of a seasoned aristocrat, Ferguson represented something much darker.

Fast forward six years in to Obama and this country is something else. The United States under Obama seems to have taken a reverse trajectory from most developing countries - opting to undevelop and take on more and more the look of the developing countries that people once upon a time came to the United States to escape from. The scenes from Ferguson were a crystallization of it - all that gear came from a program in which military equipment was transferred from the federal government to the country's police departments. Cities like Toledo, Boston, Tacoma and Davis (yes, Davis in California) have been equipped with tanks and assault rifles. Land of the free.

There's much to question about Obama's character. Some of the reports of what the man is like are quite disturbing - joking about drone strikes on civilians and standing right in front of the United Nations and demanding the right of his country to take oil by force from the Middle East are faux paus even Richard Nixon would have had nightmares from. Obama may think he's good at killing people but most of the country agrees he's a damn lousy president.

All of this should have been evident when Obama ran. Obama ran like he wanted to be a third world dictator and he delivered. His campaign was full of cult of personality and emptiness. His embrace of third world dictator style Orwellianism was on full display when he was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, in which he defecated on the whole affair by accepting the prize while promising more wars, a promise he has delivered by outpacing Bush's record of foreign interventions.

Progressives and radicals in this country have become a sad sight as those who speak truth to power, like Cornel West, have been slandered by people whose emotional ties to the first black president cloud them from seeing reality. The progressive descent from reality is so bizarre and strange - magazines like Rolling Stone have published cover stories apologizing for this president and his policies, polices of which are largely extreme versions of the ones that Rolling Stone used to act like were the coming of the Fourth Reich during the Bush years. 

All of this has come with Obama's stamp of approval, as has the remaining presence of a torture center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Obama is a sorry, sad president, of which this country can surely do better than.

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About Radical Second Things

Michael Orion is a blogger, writer, artist and photographer based in the Bay Area. Besides his maintenance and promotion of Radical Second Things, he contributes to the San Francisco newspaper SF Western Edition, where he writes about local non-profit organizations.

Mark Cappetta is a practicing Catholic and active LGBT activist. He has been instrumental in keeping Radical Second Things and updates the Facebook account almost daily.

Eva Gnostiquette is an artist, programmer, "future scientist," bi-trans girl and graphic designer. She voluntarily helped to create the first print issue Radical Second Things and designed our beautiful banners. Thanks so much, Eva!

Jordan Denato is a professional artist based out of Iowa. He took the initiative to illustrate both Jennifer Reimer's story and Michael Orion's Oscar Romero work. He has his own art studio, Tar and Feather Studios, and is a critical part of Radical Second Things.

Radical Second Things is a liberation theology themed blog that has clear cut goals - we see the structural decline of the United States and much of the west and hope to present alternatives that will offer "a preferential option for the poor" as more become vulnerable.

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